East Dulwich (Mobile) Forum

Man in balaclava on Crystal Palace Road

Hi guys,

Just a quick one, just walked from from The Actress with my girlfriend, and between there and Underhill Road on Crystal Palace Road a guy in a balaclava and puffy jacket walking in our direction angle to collide with us as it were, reaching into his jacket. Stared him in the eyes the whole way to let him know I was ready to react if something happened, and he pulled away at the last second thankfully. In light of the previous post about violent muggings in the area, I'd say to keep your eyes peeled.

G



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit was march 05, 06:07pm by GtotheD4.

As an update, called the non emergency number to let them know, they got back in touch to say they've had a number of marked and unmarked cars in the area to try and find him, with no luck.

Heartening at least to have heard back with a response so fast!
Thanks for doing that. I live on CP road.
No problem. I live on CP too and have family who live just off North Cross, so this kind of thing really gets under my skin.
I saw a guy in a balaclava in Camberwell recently - Coldharbour Lane.

I thought it was some fashion and looked the other way - he walked straight past me
(no obvious threatening action made though).
I am picking up my gf from the Gym everyday, make sure boys and girls you are not alone when walking around ED anymore... our area is awfully under-supported by the police and thugs seem to know that.
I didn't realise it was against any law to wear a balaclava.
nina_maniana Wrote:

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> I didn't realise it was against any law to wear a
> balaclava.

I don't think it is - but I suppose it's a warning sign.

The OP noticed other things though (unlike me - who averted my eyes).
From what I remember, people wearing balaclavas and helmets must remove them before entering a bank, unsurprisingly.
nina_maniana Wrote:

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> I didn't realise it was against any law to wear a balaclava.

You don't consider it threatening - or at least suspicious - behaviour?

With an altitude of 30 metres, that stretch of Crystal Palace Road is an unlikely destination for winter sports.
I can appreciate it probably isn't against the law, but everything about the situation was wrong - altering his path to make contact with us, reaching into his pocket as he drew close, keeping his eyes on me.
Regardless, not exactly the most benign thing to greet you on a quiet road, even if it was innocent - which I wholeheartedly believe it wasn't.

G
Gtothe, you'd have been quite within your rights to clout the guy, based on your description of what happened.
This is how muggers get away with it so often - they know you won't raise a finger until after they've hit you and by then it may be too late or you're not in a position to fight back any more.
I genuinely that kind of intimidation should be an imprisonable offence.
Why should you have to wait until the last possible second when the guy approached you to find out whether or not he's going to wound you or your partner ?
Too right he deserved to be owned for that behaviour.
No reason to be walking around with a balaclava on. It's hardly a ski resort. Don't ever feel threatened by these people, never cross the road or act scared. Face them down, they'll think twice about approaching then. It makes me so mad to think people like this get away with this sort of threatening behaviour.

Louisa.
KidKruger Wrote:

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> I genuinely that kind of intimidation should be an
> imprisonable offence.

It is actually, comes under threatening behaviour - behaviour which may cause a reasonable person to have a fear of violence, punishable by up to six months' imprisonment.
It is more likely intimidation than a real threat (like the guys who spit in your
direction (but on the floor) sometimes - and I do notice that as I hate spitting).

But could be a practice run sad smiley
Louisa Wrote:

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> No reason to be walking around with a balaclava
> on. It's hardly a ski resort. Don't ever feel
> threatened by these people, never cross the road
> or act scared. Face them down, they'll think twice
> about approaching then. It makes me so mad to
> think people like this get away with this sort of
> threatening behaviour.
>
> Louisa.

Terrible advice and I hope no one would actually listen to it.
If it was a mugger and you put him off, well done

But I walk down the street occasionally wearing a balaclava, as I wear one under my motorcycle helmet. I don't always take it off before I get in, as my head gets the coldest when I've had a lid on

I know it looks odd, maybe a bit alarming. But I usually don't meet people on the street, only if I do I haven't yet figured what to say that won't freak people out, so I just go about my business.

If you have a moped, you often store the lid uner the seat, so don't carry the helmet. Which might be the case here, and the guy might have been putting keys into his pocket.
Seabag Wrote:

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> If it was a mugger and you put him off, well done
>
> But I walk down the street occasionally wearing a
> balaclava, as I wear one under my motorcycle
> helmet. I don't always take it off before I get
> in, as my head gets the coldest when I've had a
> lid on
>
> I know it looks odd, maybe a bit alarming. But I
> usually don't meet people on the street, only if I
> do I haven't yet figured what to say that won't
> freak people out, so I just go about my business.
>
> If you have a moped, you often store the lid uner
> the seat, so don't carry the helmet. Which might
> be the case here, and the guy might have been
> putting keys into his pocket.

And I have a disconcerting habit of looking straight at
people sometimes - made worse by my eyesight - I know it
could all be coincidence.
SCSB79 Wrote:

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> Louisa Wrote:

> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > No reason to be walking around with a balaclava
> > on. It's hardly a ski resort. Don't ever feel
> > threatened by these people, never cross the
> road
> > or act scared. Face them down, they'll think
> twice
> > about approaching then. It makes me so mad to
> > think people like this get away with this sort
> of
> > threatening behaviour.
> >
> > Louisa.
>
> Terrible advice and I hope no one would actually
> listen to it.


Rather than jump on the bandwagon with a totally unconstructive and condescending answer, how about suggesting what you would consider to be an appropriate form of action in such a situation? Just a thought.

Louisa.
I'm inclined to sgree with Seabag's suggestion, especially as more bikes have helmet storage now (when the actual fuel tank is under the seat, the big painted tank at the front is for shopping or lid).

Having said that, if you wander round in a balaclava, you can't complain if you frighten someone into giving you a pre-emptive thump. A mate of mine had a pair of very jumpy coppers turn up at his place, threatening him with their batons, as the neighbours had called when they spotted him out the front of his house in a balaclava at midnight. It was winter and he had just got home to find his bricks had been delivered, so he was moving them round the back in multiple trips. His neighbours had done the right thing, and no harm was done that a change of underpants couldn't fix.
Louisa Wrote:

-------------------------------------------------------
> SCSB79 Wrote:

> --------------------------------------------------
> -----
> > Louisa Wrote:

> >
> --------------------------------------------------
>
> > -----
> > > No reason to be walking around with a
> balaclava
> > > on. It's hardly a ski resort. Don't ever feel
> > > threatened by these people, never cross the
> > road
> > > or act scared. Face them down, they'll think
> > twice
> > > about approaching then. It makes me so mad to
> > > think people like this get away with this
> sort
> > of
> > > threatening behaviour.
> > >
> > > Louisa.
> >
> > Terrible advice and I hope no one would
> actually
> > listen to it.
>
>
> Rather than jump on the bandwagon with a totally
> unconstructive and condescending answer, how about
> suggesting what you would consider to be an
> appropriate form of action in such a situation?
> Just a thought.
>
> Louisa.

I don't know, how about just avoid a possible menacing person... walk away, cross the road.
You are suggesting that people should "face down" someone who could potentially be violent.
Not sure why you'd suggest actions that could possibly ignite a situation that could turn nasty.

As I said, terrible advice.
May I suggest that people with 'staring eyes', who wear a balaclava whilst walking a few steps behind the only other person on a dimly lit street, with loud cuban healed shoes and carrying a cigarette lighter shaped like a gun in their hand, just consider how they might be making others uncomfortable.
Louisa Wrote:

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> No reason to be walking around with a baby in a pushchair.
> It's hardly a footpath for everyone. Don't ever feel
> threatened by these people, never cross the road
> or act scared. Face them down, they'll think twice
> about approaching then. It makes me so mad to
> think people like this get away with this sort of
> threatening behaviour.
>
> Louisa.
"You don't consider it threatening - or at least suspicious - behaviour?" <<

Not enough I'd call the police about it! Perhaps the person was cold. Perhaps they had a facial deformity or scarring or a regrettable facial tattoo they were embarassed about and wanted to hide. Perhaps they had an injury which was covered in bandages under the balaclava. Perhaps the person was a fundamentalist muslim who's burka was in the wash and she needed to cover her face to nip out to the shops.

Either way I don't think the good residents of East Dulwich need to be contemplating vigilante action any time soon :-)



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit was march 13, 04:01pm by nina_maniana.

SCSB79 Wrote:

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> I don't know, how about just avoid a possible
> menacing person... walk away, cross the road.
> You are suggesting that people should "face down"
> someone who could potentially be violent.
> Not sure why you'd suggest actions that could
> possibly ignite a situation that could turn
> nasty.
>
> As I said, terrible advice.

I would possibly try a friendly nod and smile and see
what came back.

Would be brave though - but a challenge doesn't have to be
a challenge as it were.
JohnL Wrote:

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> I would possibly try a friendly nod and smile and
> see
> what came back.


Prolly your face on the ground and your wallet missing ;)
I have also seen someone with this description on Lordship lNe near Mount Adon. I felt uncomfortable enough I called my husband and spent quite a few minutes checking over my shoulder. Balaclavad man on street with no obvious bike/cause for balaclava. All very odd, quite correctly people want to warn others. I'd rather warn people and it be unnecessary than not and something bad happens and they didn't know to have increased awareness
I think it is wrong to wear a balaclava in public. We should have a ban on face covering like they have in France

[en.wikipedia.org]

Or an anti-mask law as in many countries

[en.wikipedia.org]



Edited 2 time(s). Last edit was march 19, 02:44pm by toto.

JDR Wrote:

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I'd rather warn people and it
> be unnecessary than not and something bad happens
> and they didn't know to have increased awareness


Completely agree.

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